All posts tagged: Alaska

March

No, it’s not an April Fool’s joke to say today is March. This past week was perhaps the busiest of my semester, and this is my first chance to post. My third and final course this semester is a comparative-lit course taught by our department director, Rich Carr. I’d already got to know him some, as he is also director of the Writing Center. What’s great about taking this course this semester is that he chose the topic of Pacific literature, his specialty. He opened our first class in Samoan –it turns out that he went to Samoa for the Peace Corps years ago. He taught for a school administered by New Zealanders, and it bothered him that all the literature he was required to teach was British. Thus began his lifelong love of Pacific literature. I have to say, I felt most fortunate to be studying a subject that’s offered at few other schools. I’ve enjoyed learning about the writing conventions that distinguish Pacific literature from other English-language literatures. So, on this April Fool’s …

November

This month I finished my pedagogy course. As I’ve stated previously, we began this class online over the summer so that we’d be better grounded in our teaching when we began. Once we got here, we continued meeting weekly for 1 ½ hours (rather than the standard 3 hours). Each class opened with a discussion of how our teaching was going, what was working and what wasn’t, and we were able to give each other feedback and advice. Then we would discuss our week’s readings and explore how they applied to the classroom. The class is taught by Sarah Stanley, who oversees writing instruction at Alaska-Fairbanks. She is brilliant when it comes to rhetoric and theory, and is incredibly supportive in our teaching efforts. Her assignments are well suited to professional development. For instance, our final project was a roundtable discussion open to the public on the various ideas we studied over the course of the semester. My group discussed the relationship between the composition classroom and the notion of global citizenship, while the other …