All posts tagged: Brooklyn College

Image by Sean MacEntee

A Quarter of the Way

I had this wonderful delusion that I would write this post from an airport Starbucks while lazily sipping an iced coffee and reflecting on my first semester. Yeaaaaah, no. It didn’t work out that way at all. I got to JFK with plenty of time. Then I got “randomly selected” and subjected to a full body pat down, complete with opening of my carry-on and laptop. Then I had to track down a wheelchair. Then I had to wait until someone tracked down a wheelchair attendant for me. Then our plane experienced a mechanical failure and we had to switch to another plane at another gate.  When I finally got into my seat, I brought out my tablet to write this post. I got as far as, “I’m now a quarter of the way through grad school,” before the baggage trolley outside the plane caught my attention. Not only was it speeding, but it did a drift move straight out of a Fast and the Furious film. There was static and then the captain came on: …

Accessibility and You (Yes, You)

Although I am carting many identities with me to grad school—Afro-Latinx, low-income, LGBTQ—my disability is often the first hurdle I face when in a new environment. I posted back in March that applying to schools as a disabled applicant had been extremely stressful. I had a hell of a time finding information on a lot of college websites, let alone the specific program websites. When I contacted some schools, I felt as if they’d never had a disabled student before. Their confused noises when I asked questions about accessibility didn’t give me much confidence. Many current students had no clue about accessibility either. “I’m not disabled so I wouldn’t know anything about all of that,” was the common response. I felt like I was going at it alone, and yet during my application period, I met other disabled applicants. How was it that there were several of us and yet schools still treated us like we had never existed before this application cycle? *** When people ask me about my experiences as a student with limited …

Jess Silfa Introduction Part Deux: Brooklyn College ’18 Edition

Image: Sven-Kåre Evenseth I never thought this could be my life. Since starting grad school I’ve been giddy. Excited. Thrilled beyond belief. The summer was a slow, ticking rise up the roller coaster track and these last two weeks in grad school have been the wondrous fall. I’m still feeling the adrenaline.  I already wrote an introduction of sorts back when I was an applicant blogger here at The MFA Years—feel free to read it if you haven’t already. Since my last blog post I chose to attend Brooklyn College. I packed up my apartment near Columbia University and moved with my roommate to Flatbush to be closer to the school. So far everything about Brooklyn College is what I wanted in a school environment: it’s accessible, near family, and the faculty is wonderful. So are the other students. There are fifteen of us in the fiction concentration and we see each other every week. We’re all in one fiction seminar together and then split up between the various workshops offered by the program. The fiction …

An Inside Look With Matthue Roth, Brooklyn College ’14

What was it like living in New York City? How far does your stipend go there living wise? Oh, I was completely stipend-less. Somehow, the directors of the program would sometimes find some partial scholarship to distribute among the students, which was awesome — a few extra hundred dollars in your pocket is like buried treasure when you’re a student. But the real value of the Brooklyn College program is, it’s a top-tier school and you’re paying state-school tuition (actually, city-school tuition). Most of our professors also teach at Columbia and New School and NYU, but, you know, paying tens of thousands of dollars a year less. What was the workshop environment like? Supportive! Weirdly, totally unexpectedly supportive. Our cohort was so varied — you can probably read that as me saying “they were all so weird.” There were magical-realism people, gritty realists, two people who were playing around with speculative fiction, a graphic novelist. Everyone respected each other (our program was so small and diverse that competition wasn’t really a thing) but more to the …